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PGA Injuries

Brandt Snedeker withdraws from The Open with injury-Dr. Parekh

Selene Parekh, M.D.

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Photographer: Fred Kfoury III/Icon Sportswire

Brandt Snedeker, an eight-time winner on the PGA Tour, withdrew from The Open on Wednesday because of injury. Rib stress fracture or intercostal issue likely. MRI needed to grade severity.

Selene Parekh, M.D. (also known as the “Fantasy Doctor”) is an orthopaedic surgeon and foremost expert on sports injuries who’s fast becoming the go-to expert for the multibillion dollar fantasy sports industry. His data-driven insights and medical expertise make for powerfully accurate predictions of how anything from common sprains to devastating season-ending injuries will affect players’ careers and the success of millions of fantasy teams. Fantasy sports for Parekh is far more than a hobby: He authored and published two foundational research papers using Fantasy football data to track the epidemiology and outcomes of tendon and ligament ruptures in the NFL. Dr. Parekh joined the North Carolina Orthopaedic Clinic and Duke Orthopaedics in 2009, where he is an Associate Professor of Surgery in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Prior to his tenure at Duke, Dr. Parekh was a Foot and Ankle Surgeon at the University of North Carolina (UNC). While there, he was integrally involved in the teaching of medical students and residents. Furthermore, he served as the foot and ankle consultant to the Athletic Department, treating many of the well-known UNC athletes. In his current practice, he continues to treat competitive athletes of all levels. A graduate of the Boston University School of Medicine, Dr. Parekh completed his internship and residency at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and his fellowship in foot and ankle surgery under the direction of some of the leading global authorities at the University of Pennsylvania. The Fantasy Doctor is an avid runner and has completed the Boston Marathon, and in his former life as a high school athletic star, was offered football scholarships from several Ivy League schools and was the recipient of the Brian Piccolo Award. Dr. Parekh is married and he and his wife are the proud parents of three kids.

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PGA Injuries

Bud Cauley hospitalized after serious car crash

Selene Parekh, M.D.

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© Joshua S. Kelly-USA TODAY Sports

Pro golfer Bud Cauley was involved in a very serious car accident Friday night and is hospitalized with five broken ribs, a collapsed right lung, and a fractured lower left leg. It is 6 to 12 weeks to recover from the ribs and collapsed lung. A broken lower leg can take 5 to 6 months to return.

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PGA Injuries

U.S. Open champ Brooks Koepka (wrist) out at Masters-Dr. Parekh

Selene Parekh, M.D.

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© Brian Spurlock-USA TODAY Sports

Reigning U.S. Open champion Brooks Koepka will not play at the Masters due to a wrist injury that has kept him out since January. Koepka was diagnosed with a partially torn tendon in his left wrist. This can take 3+ months RTP.

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PGA Injuries

Rory McIlroy has heart damage due to viral infection-Dr. Morse

Jesse Morse M.D.

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© Thomas J. Russo-USA TODAY Sports

What Rory McIlroy is dealing with is left ventricular hypertrophy, or thickening of the wall of the left ventricle (the most important ventricle) of the heart secondary to a viral infection. Viral infections unfortunately can wreak have on the heart, including causing inflammation, and causing disturbances with the electrical system of the heart. Viral infections can also cause many other long-term ramifications, including causing congestive heart failure and the need for a heart replacement/transplant. Viral myocarditis is the most likely diagnosis, and it sounds like at this point that the acute scary period is over, and his heart function remains stable.

Although we do not know the extent of the damage to both the electrical activity as well as the ability to pump. A normal heart averages about 60% pumping efficiency; several diseases can cause the heart to pump less efficiently, including with viral infections. Sometimes these drops are temporary and sometimes they are permanent. If the heart’s pumping ability drops significantly, say as low as 15 to 20%, this in turn can cause some abnormal electrical impulses also known as cardiac arrhythmias. Sometimes patients need to have pacemakers or defibrillator implanted to override the hearts natural electrical system and to take over pumping for the heart. The best way to monitor the pumping ability of the heart is with an echocardiogram, basically an ultrasound of the heart. Here is a good link that can discuss viral infections of the heart: www.healthline.com/health/heart-disease/viral

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