Connect with us

NBA Injuries

Our expectations for Kevin Durant’s achilles in Brooklyn

Selene Parekh, M.D.

Published

on

Selene Parekh, M.D. (also known as the “Fantasy Doctor”) is an orthopaedic surgeon and foremost expert on sports injuries who’s fast becoming the go-to expert for the multibillion dollar fantasy sports industry. His data-driven insights and medical expertise make for powerfully accurate predictions of how anything from common sprains to devastating season-ending injuries will affect players’ careers and the success of millions of fantasy teams. Fantasy sports for Parekh is far more than a hobby: He authored and published two foundational research papers using Fantasy football data to track the epidemiology and outcomes of tendon and ligament ruptures in the NFL. Dr. Parekh joined the North Carolina Orthopaedic Clinic and Duke Orthopaedics in 2009, where he is an Associate Professor of Surgery in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Prior to his tenure at Duke, Dr. Parekh was a Foot and Ankle Surgeon at the University of North Carolina (UNC). While there, he was integrally involved in the teaching of medical students and residents. Furthermore, he served as the foot and ankle consultant to the Athletic Department, treating many of the well-known UNC athletes. In his current practice, he continues to treat competitive athletes of all levels. A graduate of the Boston University School of Medicine, Dr. Parekh completed his internship and residency at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and his fellowship in foot and ankle surgery under the direction of some of the leading global authorities at the University of Pennsylvania. The Fantasy Doctor is an avid runner and has completed the Boston Marathon, and in his former life as a high school athletic star, was offered football scholarships from several Ivy League schools and was the recipient of the Brian Piccolo Award. Dr. Parekh is married and he and his wife are the proud parents of three kids.

1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Avatar

    Pedro Linares

    July 2, 2019 at 1:20 am

    I want to say thank you to Dr Parekh together with our family because he saved the left ankle of my Daugther Diana last year in june 25/2018.

    He placed a new talus bone in her left ankle. The bone was build by a 3D printer. Was fantastic. Today my daugther is ok. Walk and Jump as anyone.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

NBA Injuries

Damian Lillard suffers groin strain

Dr. Marco Lopez

Published

on

NBA Injury Alert

Reports are stating that Damian Lillard suffered a groin strain Wednesday night vs the Grizzlies. He will not participate in the All Star game and maybe miss a couple games following the all stargame depending on the severity. We expect CJ McCollum to handle most of the scoring until Lillard gets back. In this article we will go over what exactly is a groin strain and the severity of it.

What is injured in a groin strain?

The groin muscles or the hip adductors are responsible for adducting/bringing the legs together. The groin muscles can be separated into two groups. The first group is the pectineus, adductor longus, and adductor brevis muscles which attach from the pelvis to the femur. The gracilis and adductor magnus attach from the pelvis to the knee. Any injury to these muscles are referred to as a groin strain.

How is it injured?

Groin Strain occur in sports that involve quick acceleration and sudden changes in direction as well as powerful overstretching of the leg and thigh in abduction and external rotation.

A groin strain is a stretching or tearing of the muscle group as a result of overloading the muscles beyond their normal range.

Am I at risk for injury?

Previous groin injury and adductor weakness have been linked to the incidence of adductor muscle strains. Core weakness or delayed onset of transverse abdominus recruitment increases risk of groin injury.

Are all groin sprains the same?

All groin injuries are different and are classified by their severity. They all either are defined as pain during palpation of the adductor tendons or the insertion on the pubic bone or groin pain during adduction against resistance

Grade 1: there is pain but minimal loss of strength and minimal restriction of motion

Grade 2: Tissue damage that compromises the strength of the muscle but not including complete loss of strength and function

Grade 3: Complete disruption of the muscle tendon unity including complete loss of function of the muscle.

How long am I out for?

1st degree: 2-4 weeks

2nd degree: 4-6 weeks

3rd degree: 6-10 weeks

 

Source

Nicholas, Stephen and Tyler, Timothy. Adductor Muscle Strains in sport. 2002.

Continue Reading

NBA Injuries

Gordon Hayward (broken hand) headed for surgery?

Avatar

Published

on

Continue Reading

NBA Injuries

Steph Curry hand surgery update

Avatar

Published

on

Continue Reading

Subscribe!

Subscribe To Our Newsletter! Get Every Injury Update Straight To Your Inbox!

* indicates required
Shop NFL Sideline Gear at Fanatics.com

Trending